The Jurupa Valley City Council is voting to add an anti-camping ordinance on December 19th 2019. The agenda Item is 12 (the consent calendar). The city's Annual Action Plan commits $135,000 for "a minimum of two shelter beds (600 bed nights) for Jurupa Valley homeless individuals." The 9th circuit court's ruling in  Boise vs. Martin means that if there are three homeless people in Jurupa Valley they cannot enforce the ordinance. 

 


The CONSENT CALENDAR 

(COMMENTS ON CONSENT AGENDA TAKEN HERE)

(All matters on the Consent Calendar are to be approved in one motion unless a council member requests a separate action on a specific item on the Consent Calendar. If an item is removed from the Consent Calendar, it will be discussed individually and acted upon separately.)

 

D. ORDINANCE NO. 2019-21

Requested Action: That the City Council conduct a second reading and adopt Ordinance No. 2019-21, entitled:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF JURUPA VALLEY, CALIFORNIA, ADDING CHAPTERS 11.75 AND 11.80 TO THE JURUPA VALLEY MUNICIPAL CODE PROHIBITING CERTAIN CONDUCT ON PUBLIC PROPERTY AND PROPERTY OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, INCLUDING PROHIBITING CAMPING, LIVING IN VEHICLES, HINDERING FREE PASSAGE OF PEDESTRIANS, AND BODILY FUNCTIONS, AND REGULATING THE STORAGE AND REMOVAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY ON PUBLIC PROPERTY

December 19th Agenda: 

https://www.jurupavalley.org/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_12192019-223

Complete text of the Ordinance: 

https://www.jurupavalley.org/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_12192019-223

 

Ostensibly written to comply with Boise vs. Martin 

http://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2018/09/04/15-35845.pdf

 


The 2019 Point in Time count demonstrates that there is no way to enforce the Ordinance and comply with Boise vs Martin. 

  • 2,811 sheltered and unsheltered (21% increase from 2018) 

  • 2,045 unsheltered (21% increase from 2018) 

  • 766 sheltered (21% increase from 2018)

http://dpss.co.riverside.ca.us/files/pit/2019-homeless-point-in-time-count-report.pdf

Riverside county reports a total of 766 shelter beds and 2,811 homeless people.  Most of the reported beds are restricted to women and children fleeing domestic violence. Until the City of Jurupa opens enough shelter beds the ordinance can only be enforced in violation of the rights guaranteed under the 8th amendment of the US constitution. 

 

CITY OF JURUPA VALLEY Action Plan

Jurupa Valley 2019-2020 Action Plan

To shelter 50 people at the voucher reimbursement rate of $12.50 a night for a year would cost the city $228,125 a year. Hotel vouchers are closer to $35.00 a night.  On page 29 of the Annual Action Plan under “Addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless persons:”

“There are no emergency or transitional housing beds in Jurupa Valley; however, during FY 2019-20, the City will partner with Path of Life which will provide a minimum of two shelter beds (600 bed nights) for Jurupa Valley homeless individuals on any given night. An estimated 50 individuals will benefit from these services.”

https://www.jurupavalley.org/DocumentCenter/View/546/2019-to-2020-Annual-Action-Plan-PDF

 


 

More resources about the failures of trying to police away poverty:

HOUSING NOT HANDCUFFS

NATIONAL LAW CENTER ON HOMELESSNESS & POVERTY

“Despite a lack of affordable housing and shelter space, many cities have chosen to threaten, arrest, and ticket homeless persons for performing life-sustaining activities – such as sleeping or sitting down - in outdoor public space. Indeed, the Law Center’s November 2016 report on the criminalization of homelessness, “Housing Not Handcuffs: Ending the Criminalization of Homelessness in U.S. Cities” revealed that laws civilly and criminally punishing homelessness are prevalent and dramatically increasing across the country. For example, half of all cities have one or more laws restricting camping in public, and city-wide bans on camping have increased by 69% since 2006.

In addition to laws that civilly and criminally punish homelessness, the Law Center has noted a rise in governmental practices designed to remove homeless people from public view that may not result in ticketing or arrest. Evictions of homeless encampments, for example, may be justified as a public health and safety measure even in the absence of a camping ban. Not only do these practices displace homeless people from public spaces without offering them any other place to go, but they may also result in the loss of homeless persons’ personal property.

Because people experiencing homelessness are not on the street by choice but because they lack choices, criminal and civil punishment serves no constructive purpose. Instead, criminalizing

homelessness wastes precious public resources on policies that do not work to reduce homelessness. Quite the opposite, arrests, unaffordable tickets, and displacement from public space for doing what any human being must do to survive can make homelessness more difficult to escape.”

https://nlchp.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Housing-Not-Handcuffs-Litigation-Manual.pdf

The Domino Effect Of Homelessness: Video Testimonial of the effects of trying to police away homelessness. 

https://www.california-partnership.org/content/domino-effect-homelessness